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Earthnotes
Herb Library

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DISCLAIMER: These pages are presented solely as a source of INFORMATION and ENTERTAINMENT and to provide stern warnings against use where appropriate. No claims are made for the efficacy of any herb nor for any historical herbal treatment. In no way can the information provided here take the place of the standard, legal, medical practice of any country. Additionally, some of these plants are extremely toxic and should be used only by licensed professionals who have the means to process them properly into appropriate pharmaceuticals. One final note: many plants were used for a wide range of illnesses in the past, but be aware that many of the historical uses have proven to be ineffective for the problems to which they were applied.




BUTTER-and-EGGS
Scrophulariaceae
aka Flaxweed, Pennywort, Toadflax, Wild Snapdragon, Yellow Toadflax
(Linaria vulgaris syn Antirrhinum linaria)
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This herb is no longer in common use.

PROFESSIONAL USE ONLY!
NOT USED DURING PREGNANACY!
AS LITTLE AS 20 DROPS OF THE TINCTURE CAN PRODUCE SERIOUS INTERNAL PROBLEMS!



A perennial herbaceous plant native to Europe and introduced into North America. Can be found wild in sandy soils along roadsides and fields from Newfoundland south to Georgia and west to Manitoba and New Mexico. Stems rise 8 to 30 inches tall from a running rootstock; leaves are pale green, alternate, narrow linear and sessile; flowers are yellow with orange bearded throats and appear July to August on terminal crowded spikes, resembling an egg set in a pool of butter.

PROPAGATION: By SEED in spring or autumn; by division in spring or autumn. Self seeds freely.
NEEDS: Grown as an ornamental in well-drained, neutral to alkaline soil in sun or part shade.
PART USED: Above ground portions of plant.
HARVEST: Plants are cut when flowering; dried for use.



USES

MEDICINAL:
Bitter, acrid, astringent, cathartic, diuretic, laxative. Once used to cleanse toxins from the system as in European folk medicine where it was utilized as a "blood purifier". Affects liver.
Has been used internally in the past for skin diseases, enteritis, hepatitis, jaundice, cystitis, sciatica, gall bladder problems (not a primary remedy), and edema.
Has been used externally for hemorrhoids, skin eruptions, sores and malignent ulcers.
An ointment of the flowers has been used for skin problems.
The fresh plant has been used as a poultice for a variety of external problems. A tea or the juice of the plant has been added to the bath or used as a wash for hemorrhoids and skin problems. Also, a salve made from the infusion or the juice has been used in the same manner.

DOSE: TRADITIONAL DOSAGES FOR PROFESSIONAL NOTE ONLY
!All others buy commercial preparations and follow directions carefully!
Historical reference only.
INFUSION = 2 tsp dried herb in 3/4 cup of boiling water; steeped 10 minutes; taken by the mouthful throughout the day.
TINCTURE = BY MEDICAL INSTRUCTION ONLY!

DYE:
Flowers produce yellow.





©2005 by Ernestina Parziale, CH

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