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DISCLAIMER: These pages are presented solely as a source of INFORMATION and ENTERTAINMENT and to provide stern warnings against use where appropriate. No claims are made for the efficacy of any herb nor for any historical herbal treatment. In no way can the information provided here take the place of the standard, legal, medical practice of any country. Additionally, some of these plants are extremely toxic and should be used only by licensed professionals who have the means to process them properly into appropriate pharmaceuticals. One final note: many plants were used for a wide range of illnesses in the past, but be aware that many of the historical uses have proven to be ineffective for the problems to which they were applied.




CAJUPUT
MYRTACEAE
a.k.a. Cajeput, Weeping Paperbark, Weeping Tea Tree, White Wood
(Melaleuca leucadendron)
[bai qian ceng]
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!AVOID IF PREGNANT!
OIL SUBJECT TO LEGAL RESTRICTIONS IN SOME COUNTRIES!
Oil can cause skin inflammation on small children and sensitive individuals!
Avoid applying to face, especially the nose and throat area which can cause THROAT SPASMS and BREATHING DIFFICULTIES!
DO NOT APPLY TO BROKEN SKIN!

A tree native to southeast Asia and grown as a crop in Malaysia. The fragrance of the leaves is similar to that of camphor and eucalyptus.

CONTAINS: Cajuputol, cineole, eucalyptol, lignin, melaleucin, pinene, terpinol.
OIL contains: L-limonene; 3,5,-dimethyl-4-6-di-0-methyl-phloroacetophenone; dipentene; nerolidiol; sesquiterpenes; azulene; sesquiterpene alcohols; valeraldehyde; benzaldehyde.
BARK contains: Melaleucin, oleanic acid, quercimeritrin, isoquercitrin, kaempferol-3-glucoside, kaempferols-7-glucoside, gallic acid derivatives
WOOD contains: 0.2 to 0.95% silica.



PROPAGATION: By SEED in spring; by SEMIRIPE CUTTINGS in summer.
NEEDS: Grown as a crop in moisture-retentive to wet soil which is neutral to acid and in sun. Hardy to 60ºF. Can tolerate a light and/or saline soil. Pinch out young plants to encourage bushiness.
PART USED: Oil
HARVEST: Oil is distilled from leaves and twigs.
RELATED SPECIES:
TEA TREE (Melaleuca alternifolia)
M. cajuputi
M. quinquenervia
M. viridiflora



USES

MEDICINAL:
Stimulant, antiseptic, counter-irritant, diaphoretic, vermifuge. Main use has been in liniment form, but has a long history of use in southeast Asia as a remedy for internal parasites as well.
Has been used internally for cholera, colic, amoebic dysentary, candida albicans, bronchitis, tuberculosis, colds, sinusitis, gastric infection, roundworms. In Chinese medicine an infusion of the leaf is used to treat dropsy.
Has been used externally in liniment form for gout, neuralgia, acne, nasal congestion, sinusitis, toothache, chilblains, skin problems, rheumatism, pulled muscles, sprains, bruises, muscle tension, slipped disk, low back pain, sciatica. The oil combined with camphor has been used to treat gout and rheumatism (liniment form); has been inhaled to treat colds. External application of the oil has been used for ringworm.
As a counter-irritant works by stimulating circulation to the point of application.

DOSE: TRADITIONAL DOSAGES FOR PROFESSIONAL NOTE ONLY
!All others buy commercial preparations and follow directions carefully!
CAUTION! TINY DOSES ONLY!
OIL = 1 (up to 3) drop on a sugar cube, or mixed in goodly amounts of water or juice. For internal parasites has been given once daily until symptoms subside (1 day to 1 week), then followed up a week to 10 days later to kill any eggs or hatchlings, with a second follow-up 7 to 10 days later, depending on life cycle of parasite.
EXTERNAL USE = A few drops diluted in a carrier oil or cosmetic cream or lotion.

VETERINARY:
Used in cats, dogs, and farm animals for the same purposes as humans.

AROMATHERAPY:
Considered to be antiseptic and analgesic.

CULINARY:
Used commercially to flavor candy.

INSECTS:
Used in commercial insect repellents.

OTHER:
Used commercially in perfumery, detergents, and soaps.





©2005 by Ernestina Parziale, CH

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