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DISCLAIMER: These pages are presented solely as a source of INFORMATION and ENTERTAINMENT and to provide stern warnings against use where appropriate. No claims are made for the efficacy of any herb nor for any historical herbal treatment. In no way can the information provided here take the place of the standard, legal, medical practice of any country. Additionally, some of these plants are extremely toxic and should be used only by licensed professionals who have the means to process them properly into appropriate pharmaceuticals. One final note: many plants were used for a wide range of illnesses in the past, but be aware that many of the historical uses have proven to be ineffective for the problems to which they were applied.




BUCKWHEAT
POLYGONACEAE
aka
Fagopyrum esculentum
[qiáo mài]
image
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MAY CAUSE PHOTOSENSITIVITY OF THE SKIN IN SUSCEPTIBLE INDIVIDUALS!

NOTE: Store buckwheat products in the dark as its properties deteriorate on exposure to light.

CONTAINS: Large amounts of rutin (flavonoid glycoside) which has beneficial effects on blood vessels.
SEEDS CONTAIN: Amylase, linamarase, maltase, phosphatides, protease, quercitol, rhamnose, urease.

An erect annual native to Central Asia, but cultivated in Europe, the United States, and Asia as a grain crop and food plant. Stems are green or red and smooth; leaves arrow or heart-shaped, pale green, and soft; flowers are white to pink, appearing on spreading panicles and with a light fragrance which is attractive to bees; fruit is a pyramidal nut.

PROPAGATION: By seed in spring.
NEEDS: Grown as a crop in sandy soil in sun; matures in 3 months.
HARVEST: Leaves and flowers as flowering begins, then dried; seeds when ripe, then dried for use.
PART USED: Leaves, flowers, seeds.



USES

MEDICINAL:
Vasodilatory. Controls bleeding, dilates blood vessels, reduces capillary permeability (combined with vitamin C and/or Equisetum arvense to strengthen capillaries), lowers blood pressure.
As a part of the diet has been used internally for varicose veins, chilblains, spontaneous bruising, frostbite, radiation damage, retinal hemorrhage, capillary hemorrhage, and hypertension.
In Chinese medicine the seed has been eaten for colic and diarrhea and to stop cold sweats.

DOSE: TRADITIONAL DOSAGES FOR PROFESSIONAL NOTE ONLY!
!All others buy commercial preparations and follow directions carefully!
In the case of Buckwheat, it is a simple matter to make buckwheat products as a part of your daily diet.
2 to 5 grams 3 times daily

CULINARY:
In Poland and Russia the grains are boiled to make Kasha and in northern Italy to make Polenta.
Seeds are ground into flour for baking and pancakes.
Can be prepared by cooking in vegetable broth to which tomato puree has been added, then allowed to cool and served cold.
Can be prepared by combining cooked buckwheat gruel with onions, garlic, and a dash of marjoram; allow to cool; fry like rissoles.

OTHER:
Planted as cover for gamebirds.





©2005 by Ernestina Parziale, CH

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